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Scalable green power requires a breakthrough in batteries – Gelion may have the answer. 

Lithium Ion batteries are widely used for a number of reasons, but mass production of lithium ion batteries faces serious problems of component supply (e.g. lithium, cobalt) and as a consequence, cost. Faced with these commonly acknowledged limitations of Lithium Ion technologies, Professor Maschmeyer’s team revisited an older battery chemistry based on Zinc and Bromine. By re-thinking Zinc-Bromine, Gelion has created powerful batteries with more abundant – and, thus, low-cost – materials.

Gelion’s breakthrough arises from the versatility of their systems and patented next-generation gel technology, capable of adapting the battery for different applications.

Gelion’s to-market strategy exploits this versatility, targeting diverse applications including  support for remote power infrastructure, utility storage, and distributed storage in homes and offices.

As renewable energy continues to thrive, the battery storage market will grow exponentially, requiring powerful, adaptable and scalable new technologies – principles that Gelion’s Zinc- Bromine batteries are founded upon.

Gelion Technologies Pty Ltd was founded in April 2015 as a University of Sydney Spin-out and raised its first significant capital in April 2016 through this strategic partnership with Armstrong Energy, in the process establishing Gelion UK of which it is now a wholly owned subsidiary.

Currently, Gelion main operative site is co-located within the CSIRO manufacturing precinct at 36 Bradfield Road, Lindfield, while it still maintains a strong presence at the University of Sydney’s School of Chemistry where it has access to state-of-the-art characterisation and research facilities.

Gelion’s development and prototyping activities take place in Lindfield, whereas its supporting research activities take place at The University of Sydney.

Both activities started under the umbrella of Commissioned Research and Consultancy Agreements between The University of Sydney and Gelion, properly regulating interactions between both parties.

 

The University of Sydney

Armstrong Energy

CSIRO